SOHA Family Separation Letter

SOHA Partners– Please read our Statement on the Family Separation Crisis, which was approved by the 2017-19 board. Please share it widely with your networks. Contact us at SOHA@UNLV.EDU to learn more how you can become involved. Thank you!

SOHA Family Separation Letter

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Korean Diaspora Colloquium

Korean Delegation to the United Nations Conference on International Organization, 1945. Photo courtesy of USC Libraries.

Family history can represent a transnational narrative. The Korean diaspora in a post-Japanese imperialist society pushed Mr. Song Hurn Joo to immigrate to Hawaii and eventually Los Angeles to pursue sovereignty for his country. Educated at Princeton University, these lessons and networks provided a bedrock for his lifetime career in politics. Dr. Syngman Rhee appointed him as the chairman of finance to issue bonds for the Korean government-in-exile. He educated Korea immigrants and helped unify organizations to establish the Korean National Association. Mr. Song served as the Korean National Association chairman for two terms, but was elected for three. Mr. Song’s commitment to his nation’s independence was the reason to honor his lasting memory at this year’s colloquium.

Consul General Wan-joong Kim greeting guests. Photo courtesy of the Korean Consulate’s office.
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Mr. Dong K. Kim, Jennifer Keil, and Dr. Cora Granata

Dr. Dennehy, CSUF History Department Chair, Dr. Granata, COPH Director, and Jennifer Keil, CSUF MA graduate, gathered at the Korean Consul General’s Residence in Los Angeles for the second annual Korean Diaspora Colloquium. This evening was opened by Dr. Shiyoung Park, Education Consul, to welcome the group of community leaders, scholars, and friends. Consul General Wan-joong Kim provided congratulatory remarks for the commemorative program in his home. Jennifer Keil, SOHA 1st VP, provided the keynote presentation on the life of Song Hurn Joo, a Seoul born Korean patriot who used his political connections to liberate his country from Japanese imperialism. Mr. Dong K. Kim concluded this evening with a memoir of his visionary grandfather which included personal memories. The Kim family provided archival materials and a written history that will be preserved for future scholars to analyze. We hope to create a robust oral history project that not only maintains Mr. Song Hurn Joo’s contributions, but other incredible patriots. Please contact Jennifer Keil at jennifer@70degrees.org if you’d like to contribute to this ongoing project. We hope to create a 2019 Southwest Oral History Association panel.

50th Anniversary of the Korean National Association, February 1959. Image courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library. 

OHA Archives Interest Group

“Since 1966, the Oral History Association has served as the principal membership organization for people committed to the value of oral history. OHA engages with policy makers, educators, and others to help foster best practices and encourage support for oral history and oral historians. With an international membership, OHA serves a broad and diverse audience including teachers, students, community historians, archivists, librarians, and filmmakers.”

OHA has an Archives Interest Group that provides pragmatic approaches to storing analog and born-digital files. This group was established at the 2014 OHA annual meeting. Participate in the annual meeting on October 10-14, 2018 at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

We recommend that you review the visual presentation created by Steven Sielaff at Baylor University.Video Preservation AIC Presentation_Page_01Video Preservation AIC Presentation

You can contact him directly at:

Steven Sielaff | Baylor University
Senior Editor & Collection Manager – Baylor University Institute for Oral History
One Bear Place, #97271
(312 Carroll Library)
Waco, TX 76798-7271
(254) 710-4644 – phone
www.baylor.edu/oralhistory

UNLV University Libraries

Documenting the African American Experience in Las Vegas – A Project of the UNLV University LibrariesPepperdine's Rose Parade Photo Album

The African American Experience in Las Vegas

The UNLV University Library has an incredible project directed by SOHA’s Past President, Dr. Claytee White and managed by SOHA’s Secretary & Newsletter Editor, Barbara Tabash. African American Collaborative joined together because each believes in the importance of collecting, preserving, and making accessible the history of African Americans in Las Vegas.”

Their “website was launched in January 2014, the digital collection contained approximately 600 items. During subsequent grant periods, additional materials were added to bring the total to 4543 items. The multiple formats include text, images, and multimedia. Roughly 75 oral history interviews previously conducted by the UNLV Libraries’ Oral History Research Center are searchable via keywords or full text. Additional audio clips (52 mp3 files) complement the text, as well as photograph collections (398 total images) and a small selection of items from the manuscript collections (14 documents) that are relevant to the project’s focus. Each narrator (47 total) is represented in the collection with a biographical information record in the collection that joins related materials together in one place for easy user access. While some Partners shared materials for digitization that include items like the Jay Florian Mitchell Collection held by the Nevada State Museum and Historical Society (260 images), others shared information about their holdings and links to their collection websites.

In 2016 the UNLV University Libraries partnered with VegasPBS to complete the final phase of the project. With additional grant funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and The Commission for the Las Vegas Centennial, they produced the documentary, African Americans: the Las Vegas Experience. In addition, they created a curriculum guide to help K-12 teachers incorporate video clips and primary sources into classroom teaching and assignments.”

 

Visit http://digital.library.unlv.edu/aae for more project details.

Chiriaco Summit Author

SOHA’s Dr. Mary Contini Gordon was recently a part of Calabasas Author’s Night. Please see the article posted on the station’s site below:

“Business and Innovation Leader, Speaker, Writer/Researcher and Author Dr. Mary Contini Gordon is a meticulous researcher with years of examining organizational issues in the public and private sectors. She was the executive director of the Hughes Institute for Professional Development and oversaw professional and executive development across all five Hughes Companies. After retiring at the end of 2008, she became the facilitator for the Arizona Technology Council’s CEO Network in Tucson, mostly small companies, some family businesses.

Her latest book, “Chiriaco Summit, Built by Love in the Desert“: “Wine was free, but we had to pay for water.”

Joe Chiriaco and his thirteen siblings heard this from their Italian immigrant father as he recounted his ocean journey to America. In the face of limited water and rudimentary dirt roads, Joe and his Norwegian wife, Ruth Bergseid, founded Chiriaco Summit in the 1930s, a desert travel oasis on today’s Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Los Angeles, promising to serve the world on wheels.

The twenty-four-seven challenges are lightened with the courtship of two feisty lovers, the frolicking of youngsters in the desert, more loves, and the juxtaposition of some very imposing personalities, including those of Joe Chiriaco and General Patton.

After moving through new aqueducts and highways, military camps, societal upheavals, and a welcome new set of hard-working immigrants, the twenty-first century brings provisions for electric cars, modern aircraft, and ATV facilities outside Joshua Tree National Park from whence the first Summit waters flowed.

Dr. Gordon is dedicated to telling the stories of those who may not be well known, but contribute mightily to the fabric of this country.”

Tune in to CTV3 to watch this interview or
Click here to WATCH THIS EPISODE NOW

You can watch archived episodes of Author’s Night on-line anytime with CTV Archives or on the Calabasas3 YouTube Channel.

OHA Call for Posters

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“Oral History in Our Challenging Times” Oral History Association
2018 Annual Meeting
October 10-14, Montreal, Canada
“We are now accepting poster submissions at OHA 2018.
We invite submissions for a poster session and project bazaar that will be held at the Oral History Association Conference at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada from October 10-14, 2018 The session will take place on Saturday, October 13. Proposals addressing the meeting theme, ‘Oral History in Our Challenging Times’ are especially welcome, but any timely subject of interest to oral history will be considered. Presenters must be available to discuss their posters and projects during the session.”

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Visit http://www.oralhistory.org/2018-call-for-posters/ for full details.
@ohassociation

Immigration Crisis

Digital Humanities for Social Good

Torn Apart aggregates and cross-references publicly available data to visualize the geography of Donald Trump’s ‘zero tolerance’ immigration policy in 2018 and immigration incarceration in the USA in general. We also draw attention to the landscapes, families, and communities riven by the massive web of immigrant detention in the United States.

Working nimbly and remotely from four sites in the United States over a six-day period, our small team of researchers set about identifying sources of data on immigrant detention, from ports of entry run by Customs and Border Protection (CBP), to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention centers, to shelters subcontracted by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) to care for children in their custody, to the financial trails left by a network of public, private, and non-profit organizations complicit with the complex infrastructure of immigrant detention in the United States.

Our sources for obtaining the data were varied. Those we worked from included a FOIA-ed list of ICE facilities, publicly available lists of CBP sites, data sets of ICE detainee hearings, state childcare licensing databases, government grant awards lists, and USASpending.gov . We cross-checked our data through non-governmental sources as well: news reports about immigrant detention, business databases, tax documents for non-profit organizations, job advertisements, Google Maps entries, Facebook Places, and more. All of our data has been verified through a minimum of two sources, at least one directly from the government.

What our data reveals is a shadowy network of government facilities, subcontractors from the prison-industrial complex, “non-profit” administrators paid over half a million dollars a year, and religious organizations across the country that, together, prop up the immigrant detention machine. Immigrant detention is a multi-billion dollar business and it’s happening in our own backyards. The crisis for immigrants in the United States is not only happening at the Mexico-United States border or other ports of entry. Rather, the border is everywhere.

This is not to say that Torn Apart, now in alpha release, paints a complete picture of immigrant detention. Like all maps, ours is a representation of data, reflecting choices we made while designing visualizations. For example, a simple decision to place data points in the foreground rather than in the background offers a very different reading of the locations of ICE detention centers, as the map below demonstrates.”

Read more here: http://xpmethod.plaintext.in/torn-apart/

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Who Is Making Money from ICE in Your State?

“Hundreds of for-profit and nonprofit corporations have pulled in billions of dollars worth of ICE contracts in recent years. See where these ICE operations take place and where the corporations are headquartered.” Read more here: https://readsludge.com/2018/07/06/who-is-making-money-from-ice-in-your-state/

ACLU: Under half of child reunions will meet Tuesday deadline

“The American Civil Liberties Union said it appears the Trump administration will miss a court-ordered deadline to reunite young children who were separated at the border with their parents in more than half of the cases. The ACLU said late Sunday the administration provided it with a list of 102 children under 5 years old and that “appears likely that less than half will be reunited” by Tuesday’s deadline.” Read more here:

https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/aclu-under-half-of-child-reunions-will-meet-tuesday-deadline/?__twitter_impression=true

FAMILIES BELONG TOGETHER

download“We are part of an international movement calling for an end to cruel and inhumane immigration policies.”

ENGLISH: Families Belong Together opposes the cruel, inhumane and unjustified separation of children from their parents along the U.S. border with Mexico and at other ports of entry into the U.S.  We protest the conditions in which these children are kept. We protest the irreversible trauma that has already been perpetrated on these children and their parents for the crime of seeking a better life.

To separate immigrant families, victims of violence, hunger and poverty, is to re-violate them. Children as young as 18 months are torn from their mother’s arms by the U.S. government. This is violent abuse. These families are victimized again by the government to which they turn for help. Families Belong Together opposes the inhumane policies of the Trump Administration, Border Patrol, and I.C.E. and calls for immediate reform.

ESPAÑOL: Familias Unidas, No Divididas rechaza la separación cruel, inhumana e injustificada de niños de sus padres a lo largo de la frontera de los Estados Unidos con México y en otros puertos de entrada a los EE. UU. Protestamos por las condiciones en las que se mantienen a estos niños. Protestamos contra el trauma irreversible que ya se ha perpetrado contra estos niños y sus padres por el delito de buscar una vida mejor.

Separar a las familias inmigrantes, familias víctima de la violencia, el hambre y la pobreza es volver a violentarlas. El gobierno de los Estados Unidos separa a niños de tan solo 18 meses de los brazos de sus madres. Esto es abuso. Estas familias son nuevamente victimizadas por el gobierno al que acuden en busca de ayuda. Familias Unidas, No Divididas se opone a las políticas inhumanas de la administración de Donald Trump, Protección Fronteriza y I.C.E. y pide una reforma inmediata.”

Read more here: https://familiesbelong.org

#FamiliesBelongTogether #immigration