University of Arizona Special Collections & Exhibit

This collection contains a wide variety of interviewees over many years. Interviewees include Arizona pioneers and prominent citizens. As well, histories include narrations by pioneers themselves and discuss how families came to live in certain parts of Arizona. The collection is organized alphabetically by interviewee. It comprised a wide variety of topics and subject matter. A brief overview of subject matter discussed in the oral histories is provided with the individuals name.

Visit http://speccoll.library.arizona.edu/collections/oral-history-collection for more information.

Visions of the Borderlands Exhibition

Date:

Monday, January 23 to Friday, June 30

Curator:

Bob Díaz & Verónica Reyes-Escudero

Since the 1800’s, American popular culture has been filled with romanticized depictions about the West and the US Mexican border. These stereotypes became conventions in Western novels which typically include plots that portray conflicts between “law abiding” Americans and “blood thirsty” Indians who are typically regarded “savages” and treated as “other”. The Mexican border is typically portrayed as “lawless,” and Mexicans are usually described as dirty “bandidos”. Only American law and justice can bring peace in these works. Hollywood has also perpetuated these myths as evidenced in the abundance of Western films produced throughout the 20th Century the majority of which include stereotyped portrayals of Indians and Mexicans.

Tourism was an important enterprise in the first half of the twentieth century Southwest which also perpetuated a number of myths about the West and the border. In order to attract visitors to places like Tucson, groups such as the Tucson Sunshine Climate Club created promotional materials showing lots of open space, people enjoying the sunshine by a cool, clean swimming pool, and lots of fun “cowboy” like activities, such as horseback riding and cattle drives. Dude ranches, where “real” cowboys worked, were also in abundance and owners and promoters of these businesses, typically portrayed the region as having a mild, sunny climate, with lots of opportunities to engage in a variety of outdoor activities.

Visions of the Borderlands: Myths and Realities is an exhibition inspired by two works published by the University of Arizona Press, Celluloid Pueblo by Jennifer L. Jenkins and Postcards from the Sonora Border by Daniel D. Arreola. There is a reality and a myth of the U.S.–Mexico borderlands, propagated through multiple lenses. Featuring material depicting both reality and myth through photography, posters, pamphlets, and written documentation, this exhibit centers on important areas of enterprise for the Southwest such as photography and film; copper mining; tourism; and cattle ranching. It also expresses issues of discord such as the Mexican Revolution, mining strikes, and immigrant exclusionary legislation of the time.

Visit http://speccoll.library.arizona.edu/exhibits/visions-borderlands for more exhibit information.

 

The University of Nevada Oral History Archive

The University of Nevada Oral History Archive is a database containing the transcripts of several hundred oral histories documenting Nevada’s communities, events, and people. The interviews, which date from the mid-1960s to the present, contain firsthand recollections of topics including mining, ranching, casino gaming, university history, politics and government, Great Basin Indians, and the experiences of various ethnic groups in the settlement and development of the West. The collection also features numerous biographical volumes of individuals whose lives illuminate important themes in the history of the state and region.

Many of these interviews were conducted by the University of Nevada Oral History Program, which was founded in 1964. Others were sponsored by or produced in partnership with local, regional, and national organizations including the Center for Basque Studies, Nevada Humanities, the Ninth Judicial Circuit Historical Society, the Regional Transportation of Washoe County (RTC Washoe), and the Library of Congress.

Many of the oral histories included here are connected to other manuscript and photograph collections found in Special Collections and University Archives.

Audio Recordings

In many cases, the audio recordings from which these transcripts are derived are available to researchers upon request. However, because the verbatim transcripts often were reviewed and corrected by the persons interviewed, the edited transcripts are generally recognized as the account of record and may depart from the original recordings in sequencing and content.

Permissions

The oral histories contained in this archive may be freely downloaded and/or printed for personal reference and educational use. Requests for permission to use transcripts or recordings for other purposes should be directed to the Special Collections Department, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries, (775) 682-5665, specoll@unr.edu.

Visit http://contentdm.library.unr.edu/explore/UNOHPExplore/UNOHP-home.html for more information.

Stories from the Women, Politics, and Activism Project

The “Women, Politics, and Activism Project,” at the Center for Oral and Public History focuses on the political lives and actions of Southern California women from the 1960s to the present.   This project centers on conducting more than 100 new oral histories and making accessible another 45 recently recorded interviews with a diverse group of women activists and former elected officials.  By recording women’s memories, we are demonstrating the myriad of ways women have participated in politics from formal, elected office to local community-based organizations.  These oral histories highlight how as individuals and collectively women have made a difference in the types of policies enacted by county and municipal governments in Los Angeles and Orange County.  These interviews also help us understand the reasons why women decide to take political action and, perhaps, shed light on why a gender gap still exists in Americans’ political ambitions (men are still far more likely to run for office than women).  This project also explores the important role women have played in influencing politics and policy in Southern California from outside – as leaders and members, for example, of women’s organizations, environmental organizations, and groups that advocate for workers, the poor, and the disabled.

Visit http://coph.fullerton.edu/WPA/index.php for more information.

Vietnamese American Oral History Project

About Viet Stories: Vietnamese American Oral History Project

Life Stories of Vietnamese Americans in Southern California

 

Viet Stories: Vietnamese American Oral History Project at the University of California, Irvine actively assembles, preserves, and disseminates the life stories of Vietnamese Americans in Southern California. The project contributes to expanding archives on Vietnamese Americans with the primary goal of capturing first-generation stories for students, researchers, and the community. Launched in 2011, VAOHP is housed in the Department of Asian American Studies in the School of Humanities and collaborates with the UCI Libraries Southeast Asian Archive.

There are over 1.8 million Vietnamese Americans in the United States, with the largest concentration of Vietnamese residing in Southern California. Since the 1970s, Vietnamese Americans have dramatically transformed Southern California’s demographics and landscape, and this project aims to represent the diversity of their experiences.

Our objective is to capture the oral histories of first generation Vietnamese Americans who have memories of life in Vietnam, the Vietnam War, and the displacement and resettlement of refugees from Vietnam. Viet Stories plays an instrumental role in documenting their histories and legacies in order to preserve their stories for future generations.

These audio- and/or video-taped life stories include Vietnamese and/or English-language transcripts of the interviews, brief summaries, time logs, and photographs of narrators. Some narrators have also contributed additional materials such as their own photographs and documents to be preserved with their stories. Aligned with the purpose of training future generations of leaders, faculty train UC Irvine students to conduct oral histories in their courses, such as in Linda Trinh Vo’s Research Methodologies/Field Research class and Tram Le’s Vietnamese American Experience class. These comprise a number of the “sub-collections” within Viet Stories.

Dr. Linda Trinh Vo is the Director of Viet Stories and is a Professor in the Department of Asian American Studies. Tram Le is the Associate Director of Viet Stories. Viet Stories Advisory Committee members include Dr. Vicki L. Ruiz, Professor, Department of History and Chair of Chicano/Latino Studies; Dr. James Kyung-Jin Lee, former Chair and Associate Professor of the Department of Asian American Studies; Dr. Thuy Vo Dang, Archivist, Orange County and Southeast Asian Archive Center (OC&SEAA) and Inaugural Viet Stories Project Director (now titled Associate Director); Audra Eagle Yun, the UCI Libraries’ Head of Special Collections; Christina J. Woo, Research Librarian for Chicano/Latino Studies, Linguistics, Women’s Studies, Athletics, and Music; Rina Carvalho, Department Manager, Department of Asian American Studies; and Daniel Do-Khanh, Esq., former President, Vietnamese American Community Ambassadors (VACA)- UCI alumni chapter. Viet Stories is grateful for assistance by multiple staff from the UCI Libraries, including Mark Vega, Programmer; and Sylvia Irving, Graphic Designer.

We wish to thank Michelle Light, formerly UCI Libraries’ Head of Special Collections, for her contributions to the digitalization of the interviews as well as Matthew McKinley, former UCI Libraries Digital Projects Specialist. We also would like to thank Caroline McGuire and Kasey Ning, former Department Managers, Department of Asian American Studies.

Viet Stories also collaborates with individuals and organizations to gather and house previously completed and ongoing oral history projects. Viet Stories is collaborating with the 500 Oral Histories Project by the Vietnamese American Heritage Foundation based in Texas by transcribing, translating, and digitizing their Southern California interviews. This partnership will further both our objectives of actively preserving Vietnamese American history.

If you would like to learn how you could volunteer for this project, to recommend an individual whose story should be preserved, or would like to know about how you can collaborate with Viet Stories, please contact Tram Le at vaohp@uci.edu. Viet Stories is supported by generous donations from individual donors and foundations. We welcome your donations to sustain and expand our collection.

Attend the UCI Spring Exhibit Opening Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Southeast Asian Archive, May 16, 2017.

For more information visit news.lib.uci.edu/ or contact Charla Batey, Communications & Events Officer at cbatey@uci.eduor 949-824-4658.

The Academy

The Academy’s efforts to record filmmakers’ stories began in 1948 when Film Curator Howard Walls interviewed a number of silent film pioneers such as J. Searle Dawley and Blanche Sweet. In 1989, the Academy established its Oral History Program. The program was based around recording audio interviews, with edited transcripts bound into volumes and accessed through the Margaret Herrick Library. These in-depth and long-form interviews take a detailed look at the careers of more than 70 individuals, including such visionaries as Haskell Wexler, Theadora van Runkle, and Frank Pierson. To bring these efforts into the future and to support the needs of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, the Oral History Projects department was established in late 2012. The goal is to unify and manage all forms of oral history at the Academy, from recording, to collection, curation, and preservation.


For more information about the Howard Walls and Oral History Program collections, visit the Collections page.

New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum

Oral History Program

As part of the Museum’s mission to collect and preserve the agricultural heritage of New Mexico, the Museum implemented an Oral History Program in the mid-1990s. This systematic collection of living people’s recollections of their experiences with farming, ranching, and rural life is a major component in researching and interpreting these subjects for our visitors. Curators incorporate audio tracks and quotes into most of our exhibits—wouldn’t you rather hear about history from the people that were actually there?

WWII Digital Collections

This screenshot provided by the National World War II Museum shows the home page of the National World War II Museum's new online archive project, in New Orleans, Friday, Dec. 16, 2016. Executives at the museum say creating a vast online collection of 9,000 existing oral and written histories will take longer than the war was fought: 10 years and $11 million dollars. The task is enormous: thousands of hours of audio and video must be handled and millions of words transcribed. (National World War II Museum via AP) Photo: AP / National World War II MuseumThis screenshot provided by the National World War II Museum shows the home page of the National World War II Museum’s new online archive project, in New Orleans, Friday, Dec. 16, 2016. Executives at the museum say creating a vast online collection of 9,000 existing oral and written histories will take longer than the war was fought: 10 years and $11 million dollars. The task is enormous: thousands of hours of audio and video must be handled and millions of words transcribed. (National World War II Museum via AP)