#SOHA2018 Day Three

We are excited to share some latest updates from the SOHA business meeting!

Fantastic panel this morning with Barbara Tabach, Project Manager, Oral History Research Center, UNLV Libraries; Secretary and Newsletter Editor, SOHA Board of Directors, Emily Lapworth, Digital Collections Librarian, and Aaron Mayes, Special Collections & Archives Visual Materials Curator, UNLV Libraries.

This panel was titled, “An Oral History Project for the Digital World of Now and the Future.” When #UNLV Libraries’ Oral History Research Center began the Southern Nevada Jewish Heritage Project [SNJHP], two objectives were established: 1) create a digital collection that provides online access to historical resources about the local Jewish community and 2) initiate a strategic collecting initiative that ensures the preservation of and access to historical primary sources about this community. To capture the essence of the important contributions of Jews to the history of Las Vegas, new and existing oral histories were a major component. Collections of photos, documents, videos and newspapers have been digitized for the project. The SNJHP required the collaboration of many unique talents to make materials available on a dedicated web portal and in UNLV’s Special Collections & Archives.

These #ASU students participated in the Documentary Screening and Panel Discussion: “Our Stories, Nuestras Historias.” We are glad to have so many Sun Devils here!

Our #SOHA2018 keynote Maylei Blackwell shares her story at the Plenary Session / Brunch in the Fullerton Marriott Grand Ballroom.
Professor Maylei Blackwell is an interdisciplinary scholar activist, oral historian, and author of ¡Chicana Power!
Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement, published with University of Texas Press. She is Associate Professor in the César E. Chávez Department of Chicana/o Studies and Women’s Studies Department, and affiliated faculty in the American Indian Studies and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. Professor Blackwell’s research has two distinct but interrelated trajectories that broadly analyze how women’s social movements in the U.S. and Mexico are shaped by questions of difference – factors such as race, indigeneity, class, sexuality or citizenship status – and how these differences impact the possibilities and challenges
of transnational organizing. Through collaborative and community-based research, Professor Blackwell has excavated genealogies of women of color feminism in the U.S. and accompanied indigenous women organizers in Mexico as well as feminist movements and sexual rights activists throughout Latin
American. Her most recent research with farm worker women and indigenous migrants seeks to better understand new forms of grassroots transnationalism.

Stan Rodriguez is a Kumeyaay/Iipay Ipai bird singer from Santa Ysabel Band of Digueño Indians reservation in San Diego County. He is an internationally recognized #linguist, #educator, #community #elder, and #storyteller.

And that’s a wrap! We hope to see you at @ohassociation 2018 in Montréal! Thank you @cophfullerton for hosting our SoCal Conference!

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#SOHA2018 Day Two

Fantastic start to our Saturday sessions with our plenary, “Developing #Indigenous Community and Home-Based Oral Histories.”

The Southwest Oral History Association (SOHA) is a treasure chest of talented individuals and a wellspring of templates for community curation, an opportunity for efficacious collaboration. This was the inspiration for the session, “Community Voices and Collaboration.”

#SOHA2018 afternoon session, “Panel: Queering Oral Histories in and through Community Productions.” This group discussed, “the role of oral histories as a #feminist intervention into the understudied subject of women whose varied careers, though often marginalized, have significantly contributed to film history. Participants will present clips from interviews produced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Visual History Program and discuss their roles in capturing myriad voices of female filmmakers and craftspeople.”

Southwest Oral History Association has a stellar group of scholars who are not only colleagues, but friends. Join us for our final day of conference from 8am-12:45pm! Visit southwestoralhistory.org for details.

SOHA Co-president Juan Coronado presented the Mink Award to COPH Director Natalie Fousekis.

The Mink Award luncheon with awardee Dr. Natalie Fousekis with her Center for Oral and Public History and History Department colleagues: Drs. Varzally, Granata, and Cawthra. We congratulate her for her amazing contributions to the oral history field!

Refecting on the heritage and culture of the Fullerton area, you will find the once agricultural and oil field hub to be sprawling in development and diversity. CSUF University Historian and founder of the History department, Lawrence de Graff, showcased these 200 acres of orange groves which became a collage in his book, The Fullerton Way: Fifty Years at California State University, Fullerton. He was our honored guest during our Mink Award luncheon.

Tonight we gather at the CSUF Pollak Library for a plenary session, “A Special Tribute to Claytee White: ‘I Have The Best Job in the Universe’.” Barbara Tabach, SOHA Secretary and Newsletter Editor and Dr. Claytee White are part of the UNLV community. We are delighted to showcase her work in Las Vegas and beyond.

We have had ASU Sun Devils have their work featured in the roundtable, “Creating an Exhibit Based on Oral Histories in One Semester: Accomplishments, Challenges, and Possibilities from an Undergraduate Perspective.” Alexa Irizarry Moore is a senior at Arizona State University. She majoring in History with a double minor in Spanish and Criminology. She is the descendant of Mexican and Cuban immigrants. Her family’s heritage inspired her to study
abroad in Cuba, leading her to realize her interest in becoming an immigration lawyer.

Join us for the SOHA Business Meeting that is open to all SOHA members on Sunday, April 29th from 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. at the Fullerton Marriott.

#SOHA2018

Welcome to #SOHA2018! Visit our registration table in the Fullerton Marriott. We are excited you are here with us!

#oralhistory #conference #CA #Fullerton #CSUF

Plenary Session: April 29th @ 11:15 a.m.

Keynote: Maylei Blackwell

Professor Maylei Blackwell is an interdisciplinary scholar activist, oral historian, and author of ¡Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement, published with University of Texas Press. She is Associate Professor in the César E. Chávez Department of Chicana/o Studies and Women’s Studies Department, and affiliated faculty in the American Indian Studies and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. Professor Blackwell’s research has two distinct but interrelated trajectories that broadly analyze how women’s social movements in the U.S. and Mexico are shaped by questions of difference – factors such as race, indigeneity, class, sexuality or citizenship status – and how these differences impact the possibilities and challenges of transnational organizing. Through collaborative and community-based research, Professor Blackwell has excavated genealogies of women of color feminism in the U.S. and accompanied indigenous women organizers in Mexico as well as feminist movements and sexual rights activists throughout Latin American. Her most recent research with farm worker women and indigenous migrants seeks to better understand new forms of grassroots transnationalism.

 

Closing: Stan Rodriguez

Stan Rodriguez is a Kumeyaay/Iipay Ipai bird singer from Santa Ysabel Band of Digueño Indians reservation in San Diego County. He is an internationally recognized linguist, educator, community elder, and storyteller.

 

Session Six: April 29th @ 9:30 a.m.

Marcia M. Gallo (Associate Professor of History, UNLV; Co-President, SOHA Board of Directors), Franklin Howard (MA Program, History, UNLV; Graduate Assistant, SOHA), Sarah Rodriguez (History Program, The College of William and Mary), and Leisa D. Meyer (Community Studies Professor of History, American Studies, and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies) present individual and group oral histories and interviews conducted in the early twenty-first century to reveal local and national networks that predated the conscious creation of queer neighborhoods, organizations, and media in the 1970s and 1980s.This session will explore how the development of identities informed spatial, temporal, and geographic constructions of “communities.” It also explores the impact of visual and textual representations on our communities.

Barbara Tabach (Project Manager, Oral History Research Center, UNLV Libraries; Secretary and Newsletter Editor, SOHA Board of Directors), Emily Lapworth (Digital Collections Librarian), and Aaron Mayes (Special Collections & Archives Visual Materials Curator, UNLV Libraries) discuss the Southern Nevada Jewish Heritage Project. When UNLV Libraries’ Oral History Research Center began the Southern Nevada Jewish Heritage Project [SNJHP], two objectives were established: 1) create a digital collection that provides online access to historical resources about the local Jewish community and 2) initiate a strategic collecting initiative that ensures the preservation of and access to historical primary sources about this community. To capture the essence of the important contributions of Jews to the history of Las Vegas, new and existing oral histories were a major component. Collections of photos, documents, videos and newspapers have been digitized for the project. The SNJHP required the collaboration of many unique talents to make materials available on a dedicated web portal and in UNLV’s Special Collections & Archives.

Heather M. Ponchetti Daly Ph.D. {Kumeyaay of Santa Ysabel} (University of California, Los Angeles), Gregorio Gonzales, Ph.D. {Genizaro} (President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Santa Barbara), Priscilla Martinez (Ph.D. Candidate, University of California, Santa Cruz), and José M. Aguilar-Hernández (Assistant Professor of Ethnic and Women’s Studies, College of Education and Integrative Studies, Cal Poly Pomona) work with oral histories to “un-erase” the voices of ethnic communities from southern California, northern New Mexico, and southern Arizona. (Re)tracing and elevating the lived experiences, realities, and identities of immigrant and Indigenous peoples in regions along the border, including California Native Americans, Genizaro, Chicanos/as, and Chinese, the presenters highlight various methodologies and approaches that illuminate the significance of oral histories.

Plenary Session: April 28th @ 5:00 p.m.

Stefani Evans (Project Manager, Building LasVegas Initiative, UNLV Libraries; Nevada State Representative, SOHA Board of Directors), Julia Lee (Assistant Professor of English, Loyola Marymount University), and  Peter Michel (Special Collections Curator, Special Collections and Archives, UNLV Libraries) present A Special Tribute to Claytee White: “I Have The Best Job in the Universe”

In 2017, students (Isabella Hulsizer, Alyssa Ruiz, Lerman Montoya Hermosillo, Edwin Valenti) at Arizona State University conducted a research project about their own family history, beginning with physical documents such as photos, census records, and family trees. They also interviewed a family member. Many students shared family stories of trial, error, and triumph. They then put together a documentary exploring these narratives and informing others of the importance of learning and knowing immigration history. Through this project, students learned how their ancestors encountered life and the migration/immigration process; they also have identified the value of oral history and recording stories.

SOHA Conference Keynote Speaker

Greetings SOHA Members and Supporters!

Still on the fence about coming to SOHA 2018? Well, we can assure you that we have an amazing schedule put together for you, filled to the brim with exciting sessions, performances, and speakers. Our keynote speaker for this year is Maylei Blackwell, an outstanding oral historian and scholar. For detailed information about her presentation, see the flyer or visit our website.
Information about our conference, including a program of events, and the link to conference registration can be found at http://www.southwestoralhistory.org/conference.html.
As always if you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us at soha@unlv.edu or at 702-895-5011.
See you in Fullerton! Safe Travels!

SOHA OFFICE
University of Nevada, Las Vegas