UNLV University Forum with Juan Coronado

Juan Coronado, SOHA Co-President, will be speaking at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) for the University Forum. It is scheduled for Wednesday March 13. It is sponsored by the History Department, College of Education,  Oral History Research Center, SOHA, Phi Alpha Theta, and QUNLV.

“Giving Voice to Chicano Vietnam War POWs through Oral History” brings attention to the sacrifices Latinx veterans have contributed to the U.S. and sheds light on the Latinx experience in the U.S that too often is ignored in history and popular culture.

The Latinx community in the U.S. today is living during difficult social and political times. Despite Latinos playing an integral part in all aspects of U.S. society, including in the military, national rhetoric attempts to shift public sentiments, denies most of the contributions of Latinos and instead demonizes and dehumanizes them. The family separation crisis on the border this year speaks to this type of treatment. Further, Latinx veterans themselves face deportation and have been subject to deportation for quite some time.
Juan D. Coronado has produced the first academic work on Latino Vietnam War POWs. To do so he conducted in-depth oral histories with all surviving Chicano POWs. For several of these individuals, this was the 5rst time they spoke openly of their experiences while in captivity with anyone, including family. Published in 2018, his book I’m Not Gonna Die in this Damn Place: Manliness, Identity, and Survival of the Mexican American Vietnam Prisoners of War (Michigan State University Press) provides more than an account of the military experience. From a Chicano perspective, this study also brings to life the conflicted era that saw the clashes of several movements, including the civil rights movements, the antiwar movement, and the women’s liberation movement. Coronado’s book has received praise by both academic reviewers and by military periodical reviewers and is intended for wider audiences.


JUAN DAVID CORONADO is a postdoctoral scholar at the Julian Samora Research Institute at Michigan State University. A native of the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas, he previously taught history at the University of Texas–Pan American. He is the coauthor of Mexican American Baseball in South Texas and serves on the board of the Southwest Oral History Association.

Korean Diaspora Colloquium

Korean Delegation to the United Nations Conference on International Organization, 1945. Photo courtesy of USC Libraries.

Family history can represent a transnational narrative. The Korean diaspora in a post-Japanese imperialist society pushed Mr. Song Hurn Joo to immigrate to Hawaii and eventually Los Angeles to pursue sovereignty for his country. Educated at Princeton University, these lessons and networks provided a bedrock for his lifetime career in politics. Dr. Syngman Rhee appointed him as the chairman of finance to issue bonds for the Korean government-in-exile. He educated Korea immigrants and helped unify organizations to establish the Korean National Association. Mr. Song served as the Korean National Association chairman for two terms, but was elected for three. Mr. Song’s commitment to his nation’s independence was the reason to honor his lasting memory at this year’s colloquium.

Consul General Wan-joong Kim greeting guests. Photo courtesy of the Korean Consulate’s office.
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Mr. Dong K. Kim, Jennifer Keil, and Dr. Cora Granata

Dr. Dennehy, CSUF History Department Chair, Dr. Granata, COPH Director, and Jennifer Keil, CSUF MA graduate, gathered at the Korean Consul General’s Residence in Los Angeles for the second annual Korean Diaspora Colloquium. This evening was opened by Dr. Shiyoung Park, Education Consul, to welcome the group of community leaders, scholars, and friends. Consul General Wan-joong Kim provided congratulatory remarks for the commemorative program in his home. Jennifer Keil, SOHA 1st VP, provided the keynote presentation on the life of Song Hurn Joo, a Seoul born Korean patriot who used his political connections to liberate his country from Japanese imperialism. Mr. Dong K. Kim concluded this evening with a memoir of his visionary grandfather which included personal memories. The Kim family provided archival materials and a written history that will be preserved for future scholars to analyze. We hope to create a robust oral history project that not only maintains Mr. Song Hurn Joo’s contributions, but other incredible patriots. Please contact Jennifer Keil at jennifer@70degrees.org if you’d like to contribute to this ongoing project. We hope to create a 2019 Southwest Oral History Association panel.

50th Anniversary of the Korean National Association, February 1959. Image courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library. 

The Chinese American Oral History Project

You are invited to attend a special reception and exhibition of THE CHINESE AMERICAN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT presented bythe Asian and Asian American Studies Program and the University Library, Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 4 PM . 

Please RSVP with the link below:

http://www.calstatela.edu/events/chinese-american-oral-history-project?bblinkid=46633711&bbemailid=3190037&bbejrid=278681903

Japanese Americans in WWII

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the creation of military areas along the west coast from which “any and all persons may be excluded” at the discretion of the Secretary of War. This order resulted in the mass deportation and incarceration of tens of thousands of Japanese-American citizens and residents of Japanese descent on the premise that they constituted a security risk vis-a-vis the war with Japan. These families were forced to leave their homes and nearly all of their belongings and were placed in remote military-guarded camps for the next two and a half years.

California State University, Dominguez Hills plans to mark this dark point in U.S. history with a number of activities and events.

This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visitwww.calhum.org.

 

Schedule of Events

February 6-8, 2017

FILM SERIES  (Download flyer [pdf]) Visit csudh.edu/9066 for more details.

OC Public Libraries

Orange County oral historians, don’t miss an opportunity to hear a director speak about a community project. Tram Le has presented this research at SOHA and OHA conferences. 

#oc #oralhistory #historians #community #vietnamese #uci

Long Beach 


Safe travels to Long Beach OHA and SOHA friends! We look forward to seeing you at this year’s 50th conference! @ohassociation

SOHA Award Ceremony

SOHA members, friends, and supporters: We plan to see you in Long Beach for the 50th Anniversary Oral History Association Conference from October 12-16, 2016. During the conference, SOHA will celebrate our 35th Anniversary with a special gathering and awards ceremony from 6:30 to 8:00 pm Saturday evening, October 15th. We are gathering in the beautiful and historic First Congregational Church of Long Beach, about six blocks from the conference hotel. Requested donation of $15 includes dinner and presentation of the 2016 James V. Mink Award to oral historian and filmmaker Virginia Espino. Proceeds support SOHA’s scholarship and grants programs. Please RSVP by October 7, 2016. For more information, contact SOHA  at 702-895-5011 or at  soha@unlv.edu.