University of Arizona Special Collections & Exhibit

This collection contains a wide variety of interviewees over many years. Interviewees include Arizona pioneers and prominent citizens. As well, histories include narrations by pioneers themselves and discuss how families came to live in certain parts of Arizona. The collection is organized alphabetically by interviewee. It comprised a wide variety of topics and subject matter. A brief overview of subject matter discussed in the oral histories is provided with the individuals name.

Visit http://speccoll.library.arizona.edu/collections/oral-history-collection for more information.

Visions of the Borderlands Exhibition

Date:

Monday, January 23 to Friday, June 30

Curator:

Bob Díaz & Verónica Reyes-Escudero

Since the 1800’s, American popular culture has been filled with romanticized depictions about the West and the US Mexican border. These stereotypes became conventions in Western novels which typically include plots that portray conflicts between “law abiding” Americans and “blood thirsty” Indians who are typically regarded “savages” and treated as “other”. The Mexican border is typically portrayed as “lawless,” and Mexicans are usually described as dirty “bandidos”. Only American law and justice can bring peace in these works. Hollywood has also perpetuated these myths as evidenced in the abundance of Western films produced throughout the 20th Century the majority of which include stereotyped portrayals of Indians and Mexicans.

Tourism was an important enterprise in the first half of the twentieth century Southwest which also perpetuated a number of myths about the West and the border. In order to attract visitors to places like Tucson, groups such as the Tucson Sunshine Climate Club created promotional materials showing lots of open space, people enjoying the sunshine by a cool, clean swimming pool, and lots of fun “cowboy” like activities, such as horseback riding and cattle drives. Dude ranches, where “real” cowboys worked, were also in abundance and owners and promoters of these businesses, typically portrayed the region as having a mild, sunny climate, with lots of opportunities to engage in a variety of outdoor activities.

Visions of the Borderlands: Myths and Realities is an exhibition inspired by two works published by the University of Arizona Press, Celluloid Pueblo by Jennifer L. Jenkins and Postcards from the Sonora Border by Daniel D. Arreola. There is a reality and a myth of the U.S.–Mexico borderlands, propagated through multiple lenses. Featuring material depicting both reality and myth through photography, posters, pamphlets, and written documentation, this exhibit centers on important areas of enterprise for the Southwest such as photography and film; copper mining; tourism; and cattle ranching. It also expresses issues of discord such as the Mexican Revolution, mining strikes, and immigrant exclusionary legislation of the time.

Visit http://speccoll.library.arizona.edu/exhibits/visions-borderlands for more exhibit information.

 

Stanford University Libraries

ca-stanford_univ_library_433Personal Digital Archiving 2017

March 29-31, 2017PDA logo

Stanford University
Palo Alto, CA

Stanford University Libraries is pleased to host the PDA 2017 conference. Stanford University is located in Palo Alto, CA, in the heart of Silicon Valley, and a short commuter train ride from San Francisco.

We are thrilled to announce our keynote speakers: Gary Wolf andKim Christen!

As the centrality of personal digital archives and the ubiquity of digital content grows, librarians, archivists, scholars, students, activists, and those who fill the role of the “family IT person,” have to deal with how to best select, preserve, and manage digital material. PDA 2017 seeks to host a discussion across domains focusing on how to best manage personal digital material, be it at a large institution or in a home office.

PDA 2017 will showcase both current and emerging scholarship on personal information management and personal digital archiving, as well as exciting and innovative projects and programs. Participants will include a wide-range of people and organizations.

The conference will consist of presentations, panel discussions, poster presentations and hands-on workshops.

Who should attend?

  • community organizations focused on gathering oral histories or other local collections
  • scholars, researchers and graduate students of all levels in all related disciplines
  • those preserving familial material, activist groups, hobbyists, and tool developers
  • information professionals such as archivists, librarians, and curators

CNI logo

Stanford University Libraries is pleased to have the Coalition for Networked Information serve as a collaborator for this conference.

Past PDA conference information

Personal Digital Archiving 2017 is an inclusive, friendly, and safe collaboration opportunity. We are committed to helpful and respectful communication. We are dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of event participants in any form. Sexual or discriminatory language and imagery is not appropriate for any event venue, including talks and associated social events. Participants at an event violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled at the discretion of the organizers, and their details provided to partner institutions and events.

Adapted from the Digital Library Federation and Project Hydra, and based on the example policy from the Geek Feminism wiki and the CodeofConduct4Lib. For more information, see our full Code of Conduct.

Workshops

Please note that you must be registered for the PDA conference in order to attend a workshop. Include your workshop selection in your registration. If you have already registered for the conference and wish to add a workshop selection, please do so using the link below.

Eventbrite - Personal Digital Archiving (PDA) 2017