Latina History Project

Latina

The Latina History Project (LHP) at Southwestern University is “Co-directed by faculty members Dr. Brenda Sendejo (Anthropology) and Dr. Alison Kafer (Feminist Studies) the LHP is a faculty-student research project that aims to enhance undergraduate education and provide resources on Latina/o and Chicana/o history in the Central Texas region. While the project began with the goal of digitizing the ‘Rostros y Almas/Faces and Souls’ exhibit on local Tejanas, it has grown to encompass the broader mission of enhancing understandings of Latina/o and Chicana/o history. The LHP does so through the collection of oral histories from past and present members of Southwestern community as well as several activists, including key figures in the Chicana/o Movement in Texas.” Explore their Omeka collection and discover oral histories such as Dr. Yolanda Chávez Leyva’s narrative.

View their online exhibits here: http://latinahistoryproject.omeka.net/exhibits

Oral History Project

Anthropology and Oral History: the Latina History Project in the News

The Legacy of La Raza Unida: Anthropology professor’s research focuses on early Chicana activists in Texas

[True] Stories Webinar on Oral History Methods, Dr. Brenda Sendejo

Unboxing the Buried Seeds of My Belonging

 

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Capturing the Spoken Word

The Lawrence de Graaf Center for Oral and Public History will be offering a fall workshop. RSVP today for this introductory oral history session at CSU, Fullerton.

Save the Date: Voces de Liberación Exhibit

Opening Reception: April 26, 2017 5:30P.M.

Exhibit Open: April 27, 2017 – June 21, 2017

Salz-Pollak Atrium Gallery, Pollak Library

California State University, Fullerton

800 N. State College, Fullerton, CA 92831

For more information, please call 657-278-3580.

Visit the Center for Oral and Public History website for updates.

CSUF Hansen Lecture

Spring 2017 Hansen Lecture:
Featuring Keir Pearson

When: Wednesday, April 5th at 5:30PM

Where: Titan Student Union, Theatre, CSUF

Free and Open to the Public

Students can participate in a meet and greet with

Mr. Keir Pearson from 4pm – 5pm in PLS 360! 


Pearson, an Oscar-nominated screenwriter of “Hotel Rwanda,” will speak on “History and Hollywood: The Power of Storytelling Through Film” April 5 as part of the Lawrence de Graaf Center for Oral and Public History’s annual Hansen Lecture.

Pearson, also the executive producer and screenwriter of “Chavez,” has worked extensively on historical biopics usually with sociopolitical undercurrents. He’s worked for Warner Bros., Paramount, HBO, Fox TV and History Channel.

The Hansen Lectureship was created by the Lawrence de Graaf Center for Oral and Public History in honor of Arthur A. Hansen, CSUF professor emeritus of history and retired center director. The lectureship also funds an annual fellowship for a CSUF student pursuing a master’s degree in history with an emphasis on oral and public history.

The event begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Titan Student Union’s Titan Theatre. It is free and open to the public. Students can participate in a meet and greet with Pearson from 4 to 5 p.m. in Room 360 of Pollak Library.

Read more at: http://news.fullerton.edu/2017wi/PearsonStoryteller.aspx

University of Arizona Special Collections & Exhibit

This collection contains a wide variety of interviewees over many years. Interviewees include Arizona pioneers and prominent citizens. As well, histories include narrations by pioneers themselves and discuss how families came to live in certain parts of Arizona. The collection is organized alphabetically by interviewee. It comprised a wide variety of topics and subject matter. A brief overview of subject matter discussed in the oral histories is provided with the individuals name.

Visit http://speccoll.library.arizona.edu/collections/oral-history-collection for more information.

Visions of the Borderlands Exhibition

Date:

Monday, January 23 to Friday, June 30

Curator:

Bob Díaz & Verónica Reyes-Escudero

Since the 1800’s, American popular culture has been filled with romanticized depictions about the West and the US Mexican border. These stereotypes became conventions in Western novels which typically include plots that portray conflicts between “law abiding” Americans and “blood thirsty” Indians who are typically regarded “savages” and treated as “other”. The Mexican border is typically portrayed as “lawless,” and Mexicans are usually described as dirty “bandidos”. Only American law and justice can bring peace in these works. Hollywood has also perpetuated these myths as evidenced in the abundance of Western films produced throughout the 20th Century the majority of which include stereotyped portrayals of Indians and Mexicans.

Tourism was an important enterprise in the first half of the twentieth century Southwest which also perpetuated a number of myths about the West and the border. In order to attract visitors to places like Tucson, groups such as the Tucson Sunshine Climate Club created promotional materials showing lots of open space, people enjoying the sunshine by a cool, clean swimming pool, and lots of fun “cowboy” like activities, such as horseback riding and cattle drives. Dude ranches, where “real” cowboys worked, were also in abundance and owners and promoters of these businesses, typically portrayed the region as having a mild, sunny climate, with lots of opportunities to engage in a variety of outdoor activities.

Visions of the Borderlands: Myths and Realities is an exhibition inspired by two works published by the University of Arizona Press, Celluloid Pueblo by Jennifer L. Jenkins and Postcards from the Sonora Border by Daniel D. Arreola. There is a reality and a myth of the U.S.–Mexico borderlands, propagated through multiple lenses. Featuring material depicting both reality and myth through photography, posters, pamphlets, and written documentation, this exhibit centers on important areas of enterprise for the Southwest such as photography and film; copper mining; tourism; and cattle ranching. It also expresses issues of discord such as the Mexican Revolution, mining strikes, and immigrant exclusionary legislation of the time.

Visit http://speccoll.library.arizona.edu/exhibits/visions-borderlands for more exhibit information.

 

SOHA Del Mar Conference

CSU, Fullerton graduate students Natalie Navar, Kevin Cabrera, and Carie Rael showcased their oral histories in a performance at the 2015 SOHA Conference in California. These narrators voices were echoed in the Del Mar Powerhouse Community Center with this powerful Closing Performance. This research was conducted on behalf of the Center for Oral and Public History at CSUF. Attend the 2017 conference to learn more about this performance technique! Visit southwestoralhistory.org to register.

PRESERVING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY SERIES: ORAL HISTORY WORKSHOP

San Diego History Center

SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 2017, 9AM-12:30 PM: ORAL HISTORY WORKSHOP

This introductory workshop for budding oral historians will discuss the importance of oral history and how to do it, how to select recording equipment, how to use SDHC archival resources, and how to transcribe and preserve interviews.

Taught by SDHC Oral Historian Amanda Tewes and Archivist Jane Kenealy, this workshop is perfect for those interested in starting family, community, and academic oral history projects. Includes 30-minute coffee break.

San Diego History Center, Thornton Theater
Saturday, March 25, 2017, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Tickets: $15 Members / $25 Non-Members

Purchase Tickets for Oral History Workshop

Visit http://www.sandiegohistory.org/event/preserving-family-history-series-oral-history-workshop/2017-10-21/ for more details.